Dro
tiramasu:

finally finished

tiramasu:

finally finished

when you fuck up with your girl infront of your boys and your pride wont let you apologize in front of them

prettyboyshyflizzy:

Girl: If i leave im never coming back

Boy: pshhh well alright then bitch bye then i dont need you anyway i got options

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Girl: ok bye *slams door*

You and your boys: “thats how u handle them bro”

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"lets go play 2k, we dont chase em we replace em"

*15 mins later*

image

shisnojon:

cumgirl1:

that pelvic thrust is so vicious

go AWF

shisnojon:

cumgirl1:

that pelvic thrust is so vicious

go AWF

Sometimes we waste too much time thinking about someone who doesn’t think about us for a second.

(via gl-a-mour)

We are taught that we must be better, smarter, and more polite because Black bodies are seen as worse, ignorant, and dangerous. We must remain on high alert as we navigate our own neighborhoods and are aware of tensions that arise when we walk through others. We are told to respect the police not because they have earned it by being our protectors, but because lack of respect can result in brutality and death. When we do succeed, we are considered exceptional, and when we fail, we are an expected statistic.

We have yet to reach the mundane. Our stories must be triumph or tragic because normalcy is not afforded to us. If we existed in the realm of the average, we would not be seen as a threat until we actually acted as such. If we were afforded normalcy, we would not exist in the extreme margins of society. As it stands, we are Oprah Winfrey or Renisha McBride, Barack Obama or Michael Brown. These are the narratives about Black people that resonate and attract attention — so much so that our existence as college students and professionals are still seen as exceptional, not expected.

Aisha N. Davis, “On Unforgettable Blackness,” TheFrisky.com (via thefrisky)

visualsofsamuelomare:

AfroPunk 2014 @blackfashion browngirlz